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Jewish Commentary on the Gospel for the 15th Ordinary Sunday by Rabbi Oded Peles

The reading of the Gospel of Mark 6:10 reminds us of Matthew 10:12-13. Jesus instructs the disciples: "As you enter a house, wish it peace. If the house is worthy, let your peace come upon it. If not, let your peace return to you." Greeting people with peace, welcoming them into our homes, and assisting them in their departure are fundamental themes and values recorded in Jewish scripture and demonstrated in our daily lives.

2024-07-14 Czytaj dalej...

Commentary on the Gospel for the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

On the backdrop of the Gospel about Jesus' visit to the synagogue in his hometown of Nazareth, let's make three reflections.

First...

2024-07-05 Czytaj dalej...

An International Conference, “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem” (Ps 122:6). The divine-human, messianic and eschatological gift of peace in the Holy Land (5-7 November 2024)

The Heschel Center of the Catholic University of Lublin, together with the Institute of Biblical Studies and the Center for the Study of Second Temple Judaism of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, invites everyone to a three-day international symposium on the topic of peace in the Holy Land. The symposium will be held November 5-7, 2024 at the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin.

The Holy Land has been marked by wars and unrest since ancient times. The land flowing with milk and honey (Lev 20:24), which God offered to his people, had to be conquered by Israel. Breaking the covenant with God, the chosen people suffered invasions by foreign nations, found themselves in Babylonia, until finally, after two uprisings, they were exiled and dispersed, to return to the Promised Land after nearly two millennia. What should be done so that the precious gift of peace can dawn in the Holy Land? 

 

 

 

 

2024-07-02 Czytaj dalej...

The Commandment of Tzizit: From the Time of Jesus to the Present Day

In Mark 5 we read about a woman who had suffered from hemorrhage for many years. She was instantly healed when she touched the hem of Jesus' garment. The hem of the garment is not a coincidental description. At the time of Jesus, it was customary in Jerusalem and Jewish towns in the north of the country to observe the biblical mitzvah of tzitzit. In the Book of Numbers 15,38-39 we read: “Speak to the Israelites and tell them that throughout their generations they are to make tassels for the corners of their garments, fastening a violet cord to each corner. When you use these tassels, the sight of the cord will remind you of all the commandments of the LORD and you will do them, without prostituting yourself going after the desires of your hearts and your eyes”. The commandment appears for the second time in the Book of Deuteronomy 22, 12: “You shall put tassels on the four corners of the cloak that you wrap around yourself”.

2024-06-29 Czytaj dalej...

Calming the Storm on the Lake - 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Hebrew language script in which the Old Testament Bible was written had only consonants. Similarly, the Greek text of the New Testament was a continuous script without punctuation marks. For a proper reading of the written content, the reader had to be in relationship with someone who knew the intention of the creator of the text. For this reason, Ezra introduced the custom of reading the Torah in public along with the interpretation of the sacred texts: "So they read from this book, the book of God's Law, emphatically, with the addition of an explanation, so that the people understood the reading" (Ne. 8:8).

The people of the First Covenant carrying the Hebrew Bible have their own exegetical tradition. The one making the interpretation is aware that he does not diminish the revelation he has received. His commentary only helps to understand and see the actuality of what God reveals. The principle of interpreting a given biblical passage by referring to other biblical quotations was often in effect. Targums and midrashes explained given fragments of the biblical text. Their authors used various rules, such as: looking for parallel passages, for introducing a new interpretation (gezerah shavah), modifying the reading of the text (Kal tiqrey), applying a second meaning (tartey mishma).

In commenting on today's Gospel, I would also like to refer to other fragments of Kidvey Kodesh.

2024-06-21 Czytaj dalej...

The Parable of the Mustard Seed - 11th Ordinary Sunday 2024

The word “parable” comes from two Greek words. Para—as in parallel—means to put two things side by side; balo means to cast or throw. Thus, parables throw together two images. In exploring possible connections between the parable and our lives, we discover new things both about the Kingdom of G-d and about ourselves.

2024-06-15 Czytaj dalej...

Shavuot - the Feast of Weeks

Without exaggeration, Shavuot is the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Since Passover we’ve been counting, literally, to this moment. Leviticus 23 and Deuteronomy 16 tell us when Shavuot is to take place. From the time of Passover, God says, “you shall count off seven weeks….You shall count until the day after the seventh sabbath, fifty days” (Leviticus 23:15-16). Here is why it is called Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks—it is separated from Passover by a “week” of weeks, i.e., seven weeks). This explains why it is also called Pentecost, from the Greek – because it occurs fifty days after Passover.

2024-06-11 Czytaj dalej...

Jesus’s exorcisms. Commentary on the 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The scene narrated in today’s Gospel takes place in Capernaum, where Jesus visits the home of Simon and Andrew. At the sight of crowds gathering, the concerned family tries to stop him, fearing that he has gone out of his mind (Mark 3:21). Perhaps they fear that Jesus is acting under the influence of a demon. Their fears are further reinforced by the judgments of the scribes, who state that the Master casts out demons by the ruler of the demons (Mark 3:22). In their view, Jesus is practicing magic.

2024-06-08 Czytaj dalej...

Feast of Corpus Christi - Jewish commentary by Dr. Faydra Shapiro

For the feast of Corpus Christi or the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, the gospel reading of course is the institution of the Eucharist at the Last Supper.

I guess my question is a really basic one: why specifically bread and wine? There’s a lot of significance to bread. And there’s also a lot of significance to wine. But what about bread and wine together? Why not just bread. Or, I why not bread, wine and olive oil? Why this specific pairing?

2024-06-01 Czytaj dalej...

What does the Old Testament say about the Trinity?

"The expression Trinity does not appear literally in the Old Testament, but that does not mean there is no mention of God in the Trinity?," writes Fr. Pawel Rytel-Andrianik, biblical scholar and publicist, head of the Polish section of Vatican Radio and the Vatican News, in a commentary for the Heschel Center of the Catholic University of Lublin, on Trinity Sunday of May 26.

2024-05-27 Czytaj dalej...